Types of Woods Used in Kendamas and Why You Should Care



Do you ever wonder why some kendamas are made of different kind of woods? What if a kendama felt smooth or rough to the touch? What if the weight of a kendama changed the way you felt about it?

Knowing all of the details behind kendama styles might influence your decision on which kendama to play with or purchase! Let's talk wood.

Types of Woods Used in Our Kendamas

Ash

Ash wood makes for an incredible kendama. The premium quality of the wood leaves for both interesting grain patterns and stellar play. This is a favorite for everyone. Ash is love at first sight for many players. It's like playing with art.

Cost: Premium
Density: Average density
Durability: Good durability
Feel: Smooth, but wide grain
Performace: Great performance
Weight: Average weight

Kendamas that use Ash wood:

Beech

Beech wood is the most popular type of wood used in kendama. The reasons are simple: it is inexpensive, durable, and is a fair weight. These are fantastic kendamas for a beginner, due to durability and cost. It's everything right in a kendama.

Cost: Inexpensive
Density: Average density
Durability: Average durability
Feel: Slightly rough to the touch
Performace: Good performance
Weight: Average weight

Kendamas that use Beech wood:

Cherry

Cherry wood is a very light wood used in kendamas, and is suitable for those who enjoy a softer wood. It has a slightly pinkish look and is enjoyable to hold. It is also generally less expensive than other kendamas. A light kendama like the cherry is very easy to juggle and balance.

Cost: Fairly Inexpensive
Density: Not very dense
Durability: Less durable than beech
Feel: Very soft
Performace: Good performance
Weight: Light weight

Oak

Oak wood is similar to beech, and is generally all around fantastic. It has a very strong cross grain and strong grain in general. It is featured in our Flow Kendama line and plays incredibly well.

Cost: Affordable
Density: Average density
Durability: Average durability
Feel: Rough to the touch (you can feel the grain!)
Performace: Great performance
Weight: Average weight

Kendamas that use Oak wood:

Mahogany

Mahogany is an incredible unique and beautiful wood. Boasting a gorgeous orange hue, Mahogany is perfect if you're looking for a cool kendama with style. On top of good looks, it also plays fantastically. 

Cost: Premium
Density: Slightly more dense
Durability: Good durability
Feel: Smooth to the touch
Performace: Great performance
Weight: Average weight

Kendamas that use Mahogany wood:

Maple

Maple is another incredibly popular wood used in kendama. Primarily for durability, maple is also used for its clean looks. Maple also boasts a wonderful noise when making contact on a kendama. It's an absolute favorite of the kendama community and I'd recommend at least one maple kendama in your collection. 

Cost: Inexpensive/Affordable
Density: Slightly more dense
Durability: Great durability
Feel: Smooth to the touch
Performace: Great performance
Weight: Light/Average weight

Kendamas that use Maple wood:

Walnut

Walnut is also popular, although a bit less than maple. Walnut is a perfect wood to use in laminations (or splits, such as stripes) because of its strong contrast with lighter woods. This dark wood tends to be light and have beautiful grain. 

Cost: Affordable
Density: Slightly less dense
Durability: Okay durability (slightly brittle, beware of concrete!)
Feel: Fairly smooth to the touch
Performace: Good performance
Weight: Light weight

Kendamas that use Walnut wood:

Conclusion

It is good to know what type of wood you're looking for before making a purchase. Ultimately, it comes down to your personal style. Don't be afraid to try new kendamas, despite being a size, weight, or style that you're not used to playing. You might make a new friend!

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1 Response

Mary
Mary

November 30, 2015

Thanks for the information! I was wondering if you could give some info on ash wood?

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